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Dr. Ananda Balayogi Bhavanani

CENTRAL INDIA

Sagar University in Madhya Pradesh has been in the forefront of bringing traditional Yoga teachings into the academic setup. A great deal is owed to Dr Joshi who upon deputation by Swami Kuvalayananda went to the university and built up a formidable Yoga department. His work has been continued in later years by Dr Ganesh Shankar who also served as Director of the Central Council for Research in Yoga and Naturopathy when it was under Ministry of Health and Family Welfare. In Bhopal Prof SV Rao in the Government Medical College has been an inspirational figure for Yoga Research who as both a physiologist and Yogi propagated a scientific view of Yoga on many platforms. Yogarathna KM Ganguly, a successful businessman turned Yogi has been an example of how Yoga Sadhana can be combined successfully with the material success. Even at a very senior age, his performance of Yogasanas used to put others younger to him by decades to shame.

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Dr. Ananda Balayogi Bhavanani

The Southern Peninsula of India has been the abode of a great many Yoga masters who have made this region their home and sanctified the already holy region. South India escaped the mutilation that befell North India as it was more inaccessible to invaders and the many temples and ancient architectural marvels that are still standing here are a living proof to this truth. It is also seen in the living Vedic culture that still exists south of the Vindayas.

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BY ADITHI MATHEWS

For Yogi Andre Bolourchi, an Indian holy man was someone who lived in solitude, practiced celibacy, had a beard, and wore many malas. This stereotype lifted when he met Krishna, an Indian ascetic and Yogi who taught Yoga on the beaches of Goa. We stumbled upon the video of Andre practicing Yoga and learning Ayurveda with Krishna in Goa through the World Nomad’s YouTube channel. Since we loved what we saw about Andre’s Indian Yoga experience, we got in touch with him to find out more.  Read the rest of this entry »

Pranayama at Bihar School of Yoga in Munger. Photo Credit: Coni Hörler

BY SUSHANT PANDEY

Yoga is a path; a philosophy to harmonise the interactions and expressions of consciousness and energies in an individual. There are numerous methods and tools employed to reach a state of inner poise, balance and harmony. These interactions of energies and consciousness express onto different layers of existence; creating various dimensions of human functioning and experiences. In our lives, we experience dimension of expressions in the physical, mental, emotional, intellectual and behavioural plane. From the grossest level; it is the physical body where both energy and consciousness interact on the plane of gross energies, vitality and senses. Then on subtle plane, we have the expressions of mental energies. The existence of emotional energies makes us experience the emotional dimension of being. And then we do experience more subtle expressions of intellect in the form of clear, detached and refined perspective to life and events. The cumulative interactions of these various energies and consciousness present there result in the outcome of certain behavioural patterns and interaction with the external environment. Read the rest of this entry »

New graduates from the Parimukti Yoga School

BY ADITHI MATHEWS

Yoga legends have often stressed on two things when it comes to reaping the benefits of a Yoga practice – the first is a dedicated discipline, and the second that Yoga should be practised uninterruptedly over a certain period of time. But what urges a person to return to the mat constantly and live by the 8 limbs of Yoga? Simply put, it is the intention for their practice. And setting this intention is the crucial foundation for the courses at Parimukti Yoga School. Read the rest of this entry »

At the KPJAYI Yoga Shala, Mysore India. Photo Credit: Coni Hörler

“Yoga is 99 percent practice and one percent theory.” – Sri K. Pattabhi Jois

The pioneer of Ashtanga Yoga was yoga master Sri K. Pattabhi Jois (1915-2009) who was twelve years old when he first started learning from his teacher Krishnamacharya. In 1948, he founded the Ashtanga Yoga Institute in Mysore, South India. This style of yoga has spread all over the world, providing a blueprint for many of the flowing Vinyasa yoga styles. Today, Jois’ grandson Sharath manages the institute in his grandfather’s spirit, and it is still a magnet that draws many “ashtangis” dedicated to this particular tradition practised in the so-called Mysore style.  Read the rest of this entry »

The practice of awareness. Picture Courtesy: Coni Hörler

BY SUSHANT PANDEY

The practice of awareness in Yoga is a continuous process. Discipline of yoga is not restricted to the classroom practice of a set of yogic techniques. It is slow, methodical, requires vigilance, effort, and discipline. In fact, it almost seems too difficult a task and too lofty an ideal to follow, especially in a society that does not make it easy for us to stand back and watch ourselves. When everything is moving at such a frantic pace and so much of our attention is focused on just trying to keep up, how does one internalise the awareness? The answer is to make an active commitment to the betterment of ourselves which means setting aside a certain time that will be dedicated solely to self-reflection. Read the rest of this entry »

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